Seconds:
28:08 Duration

Saturation Clipping

In this lesson, you’ll see how pushing saturation too far will cause areas to lose detail. You’ll also learn how to tell when it is happening and what causes the problem.

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9 Comments

  1. My only gripe is not being able to watch the whole video. Every time I continue watching it you are explaining something else I have to stop and check out. I only mentioned this because I like to gripe. Well explained, very informative tutorial! Thanks!

    1. I don’t follow exactly what you mean when you said “Every time I continue watching it you are explaining something else”. Does the video not start at the same place after pausing it?

    2. I’m sorry. That was my attempt to complement your course and training. I meant that I gleaned a lot of new and valuable information which I had to stop and try out. I seldom boosted the vibrance before, only the saturation, before watching the video. I am seeing more detail in my work now by raising the vibrance and lowering the saturation. Thanks.
      ” Every time I continue watching it you are explaining something else I have to stop and check out.”

    1. A similar concept related to printing would be colors that are “out of gamut”, which refers to colors that will shift to a different color when printed. But that doesn’t always mean they will lose detail like you get with saturation clipping. Printing is a more complex topic which I will cover in more detail in future lessons.

    2. Great, looking forward to it. Wondered if detail would be lost in printing if saturation clipping occurred. Thanks for reply

    3. If saturation clipping occurs, then the detail is lost period… meaning printed, on-screen or in any other use, there is little (if one channel is clipped), or no (if two channels are clipped) detail. So, yes if the RGB channels are clipped, then the detail is also lost when printed.